Next Manufacturing: Industry 4.0

New technologies are changing the face of manufacturing — from 3D printing, robotics, the industrial Internet of Things, to autonomous vehicles.​

What’s next for industrial manufacturing? 

Factories are becoming increasingly connected, as machines talk to one another, and to people. Automation and autonomy reach new milestones, too, as robots become more independent, mobile and take on more human attributes.

But another thing is happening. As manufacturing embraces the digital age, they are becoming as much purveyor of things as they are producers and sellers of data and information. Manufacturers are now crossing a threshold as they seek new ways to commercialize not only their traditional products, but also new digital and IoT-enabled services stacked upon those products. 

This is an exciting transformation, and one that will likely unfold in surprising ways. PwC will continue to tell this story of what’s next in manufacturing.​

Insights on next manufacturing

Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) and digital

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Talent

Today’s smart factories need workers that are technological agile — from mentoring robots to making a 3D-printed part. As manufacturers adopt new technologies, they’re also filling a talent gap — recruiting from other industries, partnering with schools, “up-skilling” workers and piloting apprenticeships.

Surveys and reports

Up-skilling US manufacturing: How technology is disrupting America’s industrial labor force

The new hire: How a new generation of robots is transforming manufacturing

Blogs posts

Humans and robots: Will they make each other better?

Is your board ready for disruption?

The smart factory is only as smart as its workers

Will the A&D workforce be prepared for the future?

Technology and talent: Key takeaways from PwC’s CEO Survey

Manufacturers: It’s time to invest more into our workforce

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Monetizing the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT)

The race to make “connected things” is on, with manufacturers sprinting to develop IIoT products. Yet they’re also looking to monetize these efforts through new business models designed to turn product data gathering and analysis into revenues.

Surveys and reports

Manufacturing's next big act: Building an industrial digital ecosystem

Industry 4.0: Building the digital enterprise

Monetizing the industrial internet of things

Blogs posts

The “What’s in it for my business” approach to Next Manufacturing

For US manufacturers, the IIoT future is now: Part 1

Monetizing the IIoT: Four business models for manufacturers

Manufacturers are investing heavily in digital ecosystems…but where will they get returns?

 

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Industrial mobility

Autonomous forklifts, self-driving trucks, swarms of mobile robots. The movement of materials and product inside and outside factories and warehouses is changing in almost unimaginable ways. Manufacturers are already seeing how industrial mobility can cut costs, improve efficiencies and improve worker safety.

Surveys and reports

2016 Connected Car Study

Blogs posts

How I learned to stop worrying and love the (semi) autonomous truck

New autonomous vehicle legislation a promising step toward innovation, and away from partisan politics

Connected cars: Where are we headed?

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Additive manufacturing (3D Printing)

The mainstreaming of 3D printing has arrived. And it’s changing the face of manufacturing as a go-to technology for prototyping parts and increasingly for final products, opening a future of how and where products are made.

Surveys and reports

3D Printing comes of age in US industrial manufacturing

3D printing and the new shape of industrial manufacturing

Blogs posts

3D printing and the ‘flattening’ of manufacturing

How 3D printing is moving from the lab to factory floor

Five ways 3D printing is changing manufacturing

Limitations of 3D printing

Briefing: 3D printing (PwC 2017 Global Digital IQ Survey)

Videos

Factory of the future: Additive manufacturing

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Robotics

Manufacturers have for decades led in automation technology, and now they're deploying a new generation robots — one that can see and sense what (and who) is in their midst as they move about and perform a widening array of tasks. They're also becoming more trainable, collaborative and safe (and less expensive) co-workers, further prompting swifter and wider adoption.

Surveys and reports

Manufacturing's next big act: Building an industrial digital ecosystem

The new hire: How a new generation of robots is transforming manufacturing

Blog posts

Humans and robots: Will they make each other better?

Robots are taking on more responsibility. What does this mean for manufacturing jobs?

Robotics and the age of autonomous help

Robots: what’s the next killer app?

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Virtual and augmented reality

Manufacturers are adopting virtual and augmented reality technologies in serious and innovative ways — from R&D (virtually entering the inner workings of a jet engine) to worker safety (downloading machinery repair instructions via smart glasses on an oil rig). These technologies are also connecting workers in the field and are revolutionizing worker training.

Surveys and reports

For US manufacturers, virtual reality is for real

Briefing: Augmented reality (PwC 2017 Global Digital IQ Survey)

Blog posts

For US manufacturers, virtual reality is for real

Wearable technology in the connected factory of the future

Manufacturers are putting virtual reality to work…and in surprising ways

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Cybersecurity

Most advanced manufacturing technologies potentially can be vulnerable to cyber-attack. As manufacturers adopt new Internet-based technologies, they will need to be especially vigilant to build safeguards that are as robust and innovative as their connected operations and products.

Blog posts

Airline cybersecurity: What happens when prevention fails?

Fortify your walls with digital in the midst of the Fourth Industrial Revolution

How vulnerable are industrial products companies to cyber threats?

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Videos

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Contact us

Robert McCutcheon
US Industrial Products Industry Leader
Tel: +1 (412) 355 2935
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John Livingstone
US Industrial Products Tax Leader
Tel: +1 (860) 241 7224
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Jeff Sorensen
US Industrial Products Assurance Leader
Tel: +1 (412) 316 2365
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Barry Jaruzelski
US Industrial Products Advisory Leader
Tel: +1 (973) 236 7738
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Stephen Pillsbury
Digital Operations Leader
Tel: +1 (312) 298 2257
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