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Benoa reorganisation will boost cruise ship visits

This article has been translated by PwC Indonesia as part of our Indonesia Infrastructure News Service. PwC Indonesia has not checked the accuracy of, and accepts no responsibility for the content.

Investor Daily: Penataan Benoa akan Dongkrak Kunjungan Kapal Pesiar

4 November 2019

Denpasar – Reorganisation of the land from reclamation in the Benoa Port area in Denpasar is expected to boost the number of international tourists that use cruise ships to visit the Island of Gods.

“PT Pelindo III has revised the construction plan design of the facilities in Dumping I and Dumping II of Benoa Port. It is excellent and I am very satisfied, I ensure that it will be of great benefit for Bali residents,” Bali Governor Wayan Koster said in Denpasar, Bali on Saturday (3/11).

Based on the design revision that has been agreed upon at the meeting among Pelindo III, Bali Governor Wayan Koster, Denpasar Local Government, Coordinating Ministry for Maritime Affairs, 13 hectares (51%) of Dumping I, which has a size of 25 hectares, will be utilised for an urban forest, and 12 hectares (49%) will be used for a fishery zone.

In the urban forest, there will be Casuarina equisetifolia, Manilkara kauki, Cocos nucifera L., Plumeria, Gardenia augusta, Saraca asoca, and other plants. In the fishery zone, there will be a fishing dock, cold storages, wastewater treatment plants (IPAL), and other facilities. 23 hectares (51%) of Dumping II, that has a size of 45 hectares, will be utilised for an urban forest, and 22 hectares (49%) will be utilised for an energy terminal zone (bulk liquid facility, gas stations, and gas and avtur terminals).

“Gas stations need to be built as cruise ships never refuel at Benoa, but in Singapore, so the one that receives the revenue from fuel sales is Singapore. By building the gas stations, we will [will be the one to] sell the fuel, from Indonesia,” he said.

Koster continued that the gas terminal was needed because of the Bali Clean Energy program, which obliged all power plants to use new renewable energies and gas. A gas terminal will be built there to supply PLN.

“The avtur terminal is needed by I Gusti Ngurah Rai International Airport. Until now, the terminal has been dead ahead of the runway, and it is near so it dangerous [when an aircraft] crosses. It can explode, so it has to be moved to a safer place,” Koster said.

Furthermore, at Benoa Port, there will be an area for Melasti ritual that is a hectare in size which is going to be finished in February 2020. So, it can be utilised for Melasti ritual during the next Nyepi by residents of Pedungan Customary Village in Denpasar.

According to Koster, the visit of several cruise ships that carry 2,000 passengers a trip in average should be of greater benefit for Bali residents.

“I will coordinate with the tourism association to establish routes for the cruise ships to visit a number of tourism objects during the transit in Benoa that takes 6 to 8 hours in average. In addition to tourists being able to purchase crafts and visit tourism objects, we have to seize the opportunity of providing food and beverages. They will surely need vegetables, fruits, eggs, meats, and other [consumables],” he said.

Meanwhile, PT Pelindo III (Persero) President Director Doso Agung said that Benoa Port development was set to finish by 2023.

“There are international-standard cold storages to store the produce or the agricultural products so that they can last for a long time. If cruise ships come but the agricultural products are not managed well, they will not want to use our products,” Doso said.

Doso said that his company had received the schedule for the arrival of 79 cruise ships in 2020, and the total was predicted to increase by 20-30% in 2021. According to him, the total is only for the arrival of cruise ships that spans 268 metres and carries 2,000 passengers in average. His company received an information that states Genting Dream is developing cruise ships that span 330 metres and are able to accommodate 4,000 tourists, and the cruise ship will visit Bali as well.

“If the tourists feel comfortable, they will stay longer for transit, which can take around 18 to 20 hours. It varies, but previously, [there were tourists] who only stayed for 3-4 hours, but recently [tourists] stay for 6-8 hours,” he said.

Doso said that the benchmark for success in cruise ship management could be seen from the duration of stay. With Benoa Port development, they can relax by running around or by jogging in the urban forest.

 

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