Resilient growth: Making the most of opportunities away from home

To re-ignite growth in their businesses, CEO's of companies that aspire to be global leaders have their sights set on fast-growing emerging markets, which are expected to grow twice as fast as developed countries. But, they’re also looking for opportunities that developed markets continue to yield.

To help companies assess market opportunities and craft their growth strategies for the post- recession world, PwC identifies the risks that companies should look out for at each stage of the market lifecycle in this newly released report. Learn how to effectively pinpoint the risks that exist in markets you are targeting and assess how they could impact potential opportunities. This way you are less likely to be caught off guard and are more likely to enjoy the rewards you seek.


Have you considered?

Scroll over the boxes to reveal clues that can help you weigh the risks and opportunities. For more details on each area, as well as an in-depth analysis across the broader array of risks companies frequently encounter when growing away from home, download your copy of Resilient Growth today.

Sector growth
Is the market I am looking at large and growing in my sector?
Alternative markets
Are there alternative, less popular markets with equally good growth prospects?
Information flow
Does information flow from local managers to the boardroom, and vice versa?
Social responsibility
Is our organisation doing enough to further economic and social development?
Re-entry barriers -
If I exit now and attempt to return in the future, will there be barriers to re-entry?
Supply chain -
What could put my suppliers in danger of going out of business?
Is the market I am looking at large and growing in my sector?
A country’s overall growth rate may be approaching double digits, but the growth rate in your sector may not be so attractive.
Are there alternative, less popular markets with equally good growth prospects?
There may be less popular markets that offer at least as good and ultimately better prospects because competition is not as fierce.
Does information flow from local managers to the boardroom, and vice versa?
Local managers on the ground may have more accurate information than global news organisations on which senior management may rely; sometimes local managers’ information is shaded by their vested interests in the company’s continuing to invest in the local market.
Is our organisation doing enough to further economic and social development?
Your company may meet its legal obligations, but it may lose its social contract to operate if it is not seen as an active, contributing member of the community.
If I exit now and attempt to return in the future, will there be barriers to re-entry?
Competitors may grow so much in the interim that the market may become saturated; or the host government may not grant a license to operate the second time around.
What could put my suppliers in danger of going out of business?
Energy costs may rise, regulations may change or other factors may render suppliers’ businesses unviable, and that could leave your company with gaps in its supply chain.