PwC's carbon offset projects - Rimba Raya

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Setting the scene

Air travel is an essential part of how we perform our client-facing work, but it is also one of the largest sources of our carbon emissions. To help reduce the impact of our travel our firms are adopting new meeting technologies, investing in research to advance greener air-travel, raising awareness amongst our people on alternative ways to travel, and reviewing travel policies. 

As part of our broader goal to reduce our absolute carbon impact, as of July 2019, we are investing in a range of voluntary carbon offset projects to mitigate the impact of our air travel emissions. 

Carbon offset projects prevent, reduce or remove greenhouse gas emissions to compensate for emissions occurring elsewhere. Supporting these projects allows us to have a more near-term and positive impact while we investigate and implement longer-term solutions.

How we helped

We support a range of voluntary carbon projects. Underpinning our approach is a set of strict quality criteria, including our offsets being verified by an independent third party to an established standard or protocol. Through our programme we seek to finance projects with multiple co-benefits including helping to build the market and infrastructure for renewable energy, to support local economic and social development, and to conserve thriving forests.

Impact

The Rimba Raya Biodiversity project in Indonesia preserves carbon dense tropical forest that was slated to be razed to become palm oil plantations, working closely with the 2,000 households living in the local area. Palm-oil plantations contribute to a number of ecological problems such as release of carbon emissions, destruction of natural habitats, soil erosion, soil and water pollution from the heavy use of pesticides, flood frequency and forest fires. 

With our support, and alongside other corporate partners, the project is helping to protect the wildlife that live in the area and carbon stocks. By conserving the forest the project also protects the habitat of the endangered Orangutan. Over the last five years, 50 orangutans have been rehabilitated and released back into the wild. 

By working with the 2,000 families that live in the area the project has been able to: 

  • Eliminate approximately 99% of water-borne disease agents from drinking water, by training members of the community on how to make and sell inexpensive water filtration devices. 
  • Provide training on community based agroforestry activities, including crop diversification, harvest rotation and how to use new technologies to improve production of native species. 
  • Develop new income sources: One local community enterprise has allowed 98% of women to become self employed by manufacturing and selling shrimp paste. 
  • Educate young people in the community to reduce hunting activities, reduce the chance of forest fires and protect important bird species. 
  • Establish a scholarship to fund the education of 3,750 community students for the next 10 years. 

  • Impact
  • The Rimba Raya Biodiversity project in Indonesia preserves carbon dense tropical forest that was slated to be razed to become palm oil plantations, working closely with the 2,000 households living in the local area. Palm-oil plantations contribute to a number of ecological problems such as release of carbon emissions, destruction of natural habitats, soil erosion, soil and water pollution from the heavy use of pesticides, flood frequency and forest fires. 

    With our support, and alongside other corporate partners, the project is helping to protect the wildlife that live in the area and carbon stocks. By conserving the forest the project also protects the habitat of the endangered Orangutan. Over the last five years, 50 orangutans have been rehabilitated and released back into the wild. 


    By working with the 2,000 families that live in the area the project has been able to: 

    -Eliminate approximately 99% of water-borne disease agents from drinking water, by training members of the community on how to make and sell inexpensive water filtration devices. 
    - Provide training on community based agroforestry activities, including crop diversification, harvest rotation and how to use new technologies to improve production of native species. 
    - Develop new income sources: One local community enterprise has allowed 98% of women to become self employed by manufacturing and selling shrimp paste. 
    - Educate young people in the community to reduce hunting activities, reduce the chance of forest fires and protect important bird species. 
    - Establish a scholarship to fund the education of 3,750 community students for the next 10 years. 

    Click here to learn more about PwC’s approach to offsetting and explore our complete offset portfolio.
  • Impact
  • The Rimba Raya Biodiversity project in Indonesia preserves carbon dense tropical forest that was slated to be razed to become palm oil plantations, working closely with the 2,000 households living in the local area. Palm-oil plantations contribute to a number of ecological problems such as release of carbon emissions, destruction of natural habitats, soil erosion, soil and water pollution from the heavy use of pesticides, flood frequency and forest fires. 

    With our support, and alongside other corporate partners, the project is helping to protect the wildlife that live in the area and carbon stocks. By conserving the forest the project also protects the habitat of the endangered Orangutan. Over the last five years, 50 orangutans have been rehabilitated and released back into the wild. 


    By working with the 2,000 families that live in the area the project has been able to: 

    -Eliminate approximately 99% of water-borne disease agents from drinking water, by training members of the community on how to make and sell inexpensive water filtration devices. 
    - Provide training on community based agroforestry activities, including crop diversification, harvest rotation and how to use new technologies to improve production of native species. 
    - Develop new income sources: One local community enterprise has allowed 98% of women to become self employed by manufacturing and selling shrimp paste. 
    - Educate young people in the community to reduce hunting activities, reduce the chance of forest fires and protect important bird species. 
    - Establish a scholarship to fund the education of 3,750 community students for the next 10 years. 

    Click here to learn more about PwC’s approach to offsetting and explore our complete offset portfolio.
  • Contact us

    Kirsty Jennings

    Global Corporate Responsibility Leader, PwC Australia

    Tel: +61 3 8603 0174

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