Top health industry issues of 2020: Will digital start to show an ROI?

In 2020, US healthcare, and especially how it is delivered and how much we pay for it, will be top of mind. Politicians will float many bold plans for transforming the industry. Health system leaders will tout their investments in technology and transformation, as the US health industry works to catch up to the rest of the digital economy. The question for 2020 will be whether this digital transformation will benefit consumers — marking a new dawn for the US health industry and for the people whose lives depend on it.

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A looming tsunami of high prices

A looming tsunami of high prices

Facing a tsunami of high-priced gene and cell therapies and ever-rising provider prices in 2020, employers, public and commercial payers, and American consumers will seek — and sometimes find — creative ways to finance care, spread risk and ensure that their money is paying for value.

True or false?
Medical cost trend is expected to decrease in 2020. Find the answer and learn more.

Regulation trumps policy

Regulation trumps policy

Despite strong rhetoric on healthcare from campaigning politicians, the outcome of the 2020 election is unlikely to bring about profound, industry-shaking change. Instead, the heated political contest likely will determine the fate of Trump administration policies on Medicaid, the Affordable Care Act, pricing transparency and trade.

True or false?
Industry should expect the HHS to publish less regulation than usual next year. Find the answer and learn more.

Consumers inch closer to DIY healthcare

Consumers inch closer to DIY healthcare

In 2020, DIY healthcare takes on new meaning as American consumers will begin to finally reap benefits from the enormous investments in data collection, storage and analysis that have been made by the US health industry. Beyond offering them tools to monitor their vitals, at-home devices to test for strep throat or flu or personal health records that consumers themselves must populate, companies are building business models around giving consumers access to their own data, with insights attached.

True or false?
Across all industries, the biggest obstacle to monetizing data is lack of analytical talent. Find the answer and learn more.

US health organizations are seeking opportunities overseas and through innovation. Beware of the tax risks.

US health organizations are seeking opportunities overseas and through innovation. Beware of the tax risks.

US-based healthcare organizations increasingly are hunting for new ways to grow their healthcare mission overseas and through investments in novel technologies and business models. Their objectives can range from extending healthcare services to new communities to unearthing rich new sources of funds.

True or false?
The OECD wants to profoundly change the way member nations tax digital business activity. Find the answer and learn more.

A whole new you: Deals as makeovers

A whole new you: Deals as makeovers

In 2020, organizations will make strategic deals not to just grow larger but instead to expand into new identities with platforms anchored in value, innovation, customer experience and population health. As they weigh their options, health companies will need to ensure that the deals they pursue pass the sniff test of employers and consumers seeking more affordable care.

True or false?
Healthcare consumers by and large believe healthcare deals activity benefits them. Find the answer and learn more.

Equity and inclusion, not just diversity, as a business imperative

Equity and inclusion, not just diversity, as a business imperative

In 2020, health companies will align diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives with business goals and identify blind spots that are compromising their abilities to achieve the mission of providing equitable access to lifesaving care. They will begin to apply an inclusive and equitable lens to their research, products and services, as they plan boards of directors, leadership teams and workforces that look like, think like, and understand the diverse patients they serve.

True or false? 
Promoting diversity in leadership is a workforce priority for most healthcare organizations in 2020. Find the answer and learn more.

Contact us

Benjamin Isgur

Health Research Institute Leader, PwC US

Kelly Barnes

Global and US Health Industries Leader, PwC US

Karen C. Young

US Pharmaceutical and Life Sciences Leader, PwC US

Gurpreet Singh

Health Services Leader, PwC US

Kathleen Michael

US Health Industries Tax Leader, PwC US

Douglas Strang

Global Pharmaceutical and Life Sciences Advisory Leader, PwC US

Tim Weld

US Health Industries Assurance Leader, PwC US

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