Consumer Intelligence Series: The wearable life 2.0

At a glance

The wearable life 2.0 - Connected living in a wearable world

Through new original research, this follow-up report explores consumer attitudes and preferences towards wearable technology - what’s changed, what’s improved, and what the wearable future has in store for the US and beyond.

Building upon a study performed in 2014, PwC launched the 2016 Consumer Intelligence Series report on wearables to better understand the wearable technology consumption landscape and identify trends in the industry to unearth potential opportunities and applications. 

We sampled 1,000 US consumers via an online survey to explore consumer behavior and preferences towards wearables. This research primarily focused on the attitudes consumers have towards wearable technology, as well as an in depth look at penetration and usage of various types of devices, Additionally, we explored the benefits and underlying motivations behind usage and how it impacts both individuals and society.

 

New this report! From emerging to developed countries, wearable technology is growing at a rapid clip worldwide. In an effort to understand how user wants and behaviors differ around the world, we peeked behind the wearable curtain of four quite different countries: AustraliaEnglandMexico, andSingapore. To do this, we sampled 500 respondents from each country via an online survey and uncovered wearable similarities and differences across our borders. 

For a look back, read our 2014 Consumer Intelligence Series Report, The Wearable Future.

 

 

About the Consumer Intelligence Series: Consumer Intelligence Series, now in its 7th year, is PwC's ongoing consumer focused research through which we gain directional insights on consumer attitudes and behaviors in the rapidly changing media and technology landscape. Our findings reflect the intersection between an online survey, a series of focus groups, immersion sessions with industry specialists and an online listening campaign.

Visit the Consumer Intelligence Series archive page for more issues