Respond to cybercrime and data breach

Welcome to the machine

Some hackers steal data. Others hijack system resources. A few are vandals or pranksters. They use malware, guesswork or deception to exploit networks, and their methods are legion. Worms and viruses arrive as friendly attachments; then they wreak havoc. Phishers snag data using spoof emails. Packet sniffers grab it in transit. Trojan horses launch spyware or exploit vulnerable ports, and keyloggers track your typing. Rootkits force 'zombie' computers to send spam or stage denial-of-service attacks, unknown to their owners. And low-tech tactics, such as cracking passwords by trial and error or making crank calls to helpdesks to obtain passwords, are as formidable as their more sophisticated cousins.

 
As cyberattacks continue to escalate, the survey finds companies aren’t doing enough to defend themselves.

2013 US State of Cybercrime Survey

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Nearly 30% of survey respondents don't have a plan for responding to cyberattacks against their organization

 
Watch our panel discussion regarding the security, risk and governance aspect of moving to the cloud.

Cyber Security Video Series

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Watch our panel discussion regarding the risks and opportunities associated with accessing corporate data from mobile devices.

Cyber Security Video Series

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Watch our panel discussion regarding payment cards and the controls you should have in place to protect your data.

Cyber Security Video Series

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Raise the drawbridge

Combating cybercrime is a game of cat and mouse, and good managers keep abreast of trends. No system is impervious. PwC knows crimeware, and our vulnerability assessments promote awareness, preparedness and detection. We excel at data compliance and network investigations, and our experienced EnCase examiners, malware experts and former law enforcement professionals are skilled in digital forensics and cybercrime. Recognize and respond to security breaches, and keep hackers at bay.

Understand and manage cybersecurity risks

With cyberattacks posing unprecedented threats to the ecosystem, companies are beginning to understand that the real goal is to minimize, rather than eliminate, the damage and disruption they can do to the business. By considering threats now—instead of waiting until a breach is brought to light—they can limit the negative impact, such as the theft of research and development information, monetization of credit card data or financial records, rapid replication of product or process, access to strategic or customer information, and the disruption of operational stability.