Transforming talent

Technology drivers
Transforming talent
Building bridges between today’s talent and tomorrow’s skills

 
Jim Gallogly,
CEO of LyondellBasell
In this period of rebuilding and preparing for the future, a new kind of talent engagement strategy is needed. “Do more with less” has taken its toll on morale over the past five years.
Upgrading skills supports innovation, and transformation

As US CEOs return to growth mode, anxiety over skills needs intensifies. Business leaders recognize that the people currently in place will drive transformation in the near term. This is different than the viewthat the skills of the people in place now will be irrelevant in 10 years.

Most employees know their skills likely have a shelf life in this economy. So do their employers. Thus the significance of training – and re-training – programs continues to rise to the top to bridge transitions from old to new business models.

 
John Haley,
chairman and CEO of Towers Watson
Will skills gaps confound US CEO plans to expand in 2014?
Connect with our leaders
Ed Boswell
Products & Services Industries Leader, People & Change
Tel: + 1 (704) 350 8125
Scott Olsen
US Leader, Human Resource Services
Tel: +1 (646) 471 0651
Bhushan Sethi
Financial Services Leader, People & Change
Tel: +1 (646) 471 2377

 
Dinos Iordanou,
chairman and CEO, Arch Capital Group Limited
Revamping talent assessment frameworks

CEOs are seeking to create the right environment and being transparent about what success in the company looks like. US CEOs are also talking about how to step up what they see as much-needed collaboration with the educational system. They can’t wait for the government to make more meaningful progress in creating a skilled workforce.

CEO perspectives


Gary J. Goldberg,
CEO, Newmont Mining Corporation
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“When you look at employees and local communities, the big change I’ve seen in the last five to 10 years is how interconnected they are. We can do one thing in Ghana and it shows up in Indonesia right away. People know what’s going on. It drives the industry to be very transparent about what you’re doing, to explain why you do certain things the way you do them along the way, because the whole world is very well connected.”


Stephen A. Schwarzman,
Chairman, CEO and co-founder of Blackstone
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“Because we’ve grown over the years, 27% to 29% a year, we’re always starting new parts of our business, which gives younger people a chance to be promoted and grow a new business for us. That sense of being in charge of things, of ownership, entrepreneurship, self-actualization, that’s really important.”


Tom Casey,
Chairman and CEO, Tronox.
Watch the video

“It’s important to identify leaders at the operating levels and they become your advocate, your megaphone for cultural change. It’s very difficult if you don’t find them or they don’t identify themselves. If they don’t volunteer, you’re going to have to identify them,”


Robert M. Dutkowsky,
CEO, Tech Data Corporation
Watch the video

“It’s a never-ending process to find the right people. We’ve changed our recruiting techniques. We use all the tools in the online social sites, and we network like crazy.”

“When you look at employees and local communities, the big change I’ve seen in the last five to 10 years is how interconnected they are. We can do one thing in Ghana and it shows up in Indonesia right away. People know what’s going on. It drives the industry to be very transparent about what you’re doing, to explain why you do certain things the way you do them along the way, because the whole world is very well connected.”
Gary J. Goldberg, CEO, Newmont Mining Corporation

“Because we’ve grown over the years, 27% to 29% a year, we’re always starting new parts of our business, which gives younger people a chance to be promoted and grow a new business for us. That sense of being in charge of things, of ownership, entrepreneurship, self-actualization, that’s really important.”
Stephen A. Schwarzman, chairman, CEO and co-founder of Blackstone

“It’s important to identify leaders at the operating levels and they become your advocate, your megaphone for cultural change. It’s very difficult if you don’t find them or they don’t identify themselves. If they don’t volunteer, you’re going to have to identify them,”
Tom Casey, chairman and CEO of Tronox Limited

“It’s a never-ending process to find the right people. We’ve changed our recruiting techniques. We use all the tools in the online social sites, and we network like crazy.”
Robert M. Dutkowsky, CEO, Tech Data Corporation.

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Business implications
  • Getting people excited and connected to the strategy matters when CEOs make changes in their business model. Being transparent about what it will take to be successful and where the company’s is headed is important.

  • Equally, being clear about expectations about employee behavior, for example, in how to interact with customers or collaborate together with other people helps change the corporate culture. Leaders need to create the environment and back their employees as they go through the changes to improve employee engagement and raise the levels of trust.

  • Support your employees’ desires for new skills. Be clear around what skills are needed in the future, what are the technical and managerial skills that employees need to develop. The enthusiasm generated by Massively Open Online Courses (MOOCs) offer a path; they indicate demand for non-traditional and self-directed learning.

  • Look beyond the hype around data analytics for HR. Apply analytics to answer specific questions. For example, what schools yield successful recruits? When are employees likely to leave the organization? How effective is a specific flexibility program?
Connect with our leaders
Ed Boswell
Products & Services Industries Leader, People & Change
Tel: + 1 (704) 350 8125
Scott Olsen
US Leader, Human Resource Services
Tel: +1 (646) 471 0651
Bhushan Sethi
Financial Services Leader, People & Change
Tel: +1 (646) 471 2377