Ahead on Sustainability

The Agenda on Sustainability is our platform for sharing developments on sustainability and the climate change agenda.

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Our insights

#6. Measuring & managing total impact: A new language for business decisions

30 October 2013

Leading companies are starting to think about the impact they have in a most holistic sense. Companies need to start thinking strategically about how they interact with global mega trends like growing populations, dwindling natural resources and climate change in order to stay relevant in the 21st century. Such companies have started to look into ways to measure their value in financial (to shareholders and to themselves) and non-financial (to society) terms. This ability to account for both financial and non-financial value could give businesses a unique perspective on decision-making.

By allowing management to see the relative trade-offs in value, companies can make a more balanced decision about how their decision will benefit all stakeholders.

What is Total Impact Measurement & Management (TIMM)?

TIMM is a framework developed by PwC to assist companies in thinking in a more integrated way and enabling them to see the value they have in a more holistic sense. TIMM was developed over a period of 3 years, to help clients measure and manage goals and track performance against set objectives. It also enables better engagement with government concerning license to operate and helps change mind sets to adopt a more holistic perspective and move towards Integrated Reporting.

How can TIMM benefit businesses?

The TIMM framework puts a value (positive or negative) on impacts across four key dimensions namely society, tax, economics, and the environment to help businesses understand how are stakeholders affected by their choices. It gives businesses the ability to compare strategies and investment choices, evaluating the total impact of each dimension.

For example, if a beverage company in Africa has a choice between importing certain raw materials and growing them locally, TIMM is able to provide an overview of the total impact for each option as illustrated below:

'
Option 1: Import

Upside: more water for the community

Downside: higher GHG emissions

'
Option 2: Grow locally

Upside: communities benefit more (jobs + health etc) + lower GHG emissions

Downside: more water used

For more insights

Click on this link to download our report entitled “Measuring and managing total impact: A new language for business decisions”, which was launched at the United Nations MDG Innovation Forum on 24th September 2013.

How we can help

Our Sustainability & Climate Change team can help you integrate sustainability into your organisation's long term strategic and operational plans to create lasting value, enhance reputation and build public trust. Our team offers you support in strategic sustainability, carbon management, supply chain operations, assurance and reporting, governance, risk and compliance, policy and economics and tax and the regulatory environment.

For more details on our service offering, feel free to contact any one of our team members.

Look out for more from us

We’ll be using "Ahead on Sustainability” as the platform to share developments and "nice to know" matters on the sustainability & climate change agenda. We hope you’ll find this useful and interesting and we look forward to your feedback or questions.


This mailer has been prepared for general guidance on matters of interest only, and does not constitute professional advice. You should not act upon the information contained in this document without obtaining specific professional advice. No representation or warranty (express or implied) is given as to the accuracy or completeness of the information contained in this document, and, to the extent permitted by law, PwC Consulting Services (M) Sdn Bhd., its members, employees and agents do not accept or assume any liability, responsibility or duty of care for any consequences of you or anyone else acting, or refraining to act, in reliance on the information contained in this document or for any decision based on it.

© 2013 PwC Consulting Services (M) Sdn Bhd. All rights reserved. "PricewaterhouseCoopers" and/or "PwC" refers to the individual members of the PricewaterhouseCoopers organisation in Malaysia, each of which is a separate and independent legal entity. Please see www.pwc.com/structure for further details.

#5. Pulse check on climate change

20 August 2013

The ASEAN region is home to some of the world’s more diverse landscapes and ecosystems, making it particularly vulnerable to the impact of climate change. Concerned companies are therefore starting to incorporate climate change mitigation strategies into their business plans.

Companies within the region are starting to realise that there are risks to alleviate and opportunities to be seized by addressing climate change. Preparing for the future will not only help companies enhance their brand and reputation, but also create opportunities along the value chain.

In July 2013, PwC Malaysia's Sustainability & Climate Change team launched a report entitled, Pulse Check on Climate Change. The report highlights some interesting perspectives on the maturity of climate change management and reporting in the region.

For more insights

Read our report on the how companies are responding to the call to adopt low-carbon strategies at a time when regulatory requirements are still growing within the region.

The report presents finding from an online survey conducted among prominent companies across different industries in Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia, Philippines and Vietnam. The survey was conducted between August and September 2012 primarily to explore how companies embed sustainability into their business practices. Part of the survey specifically focused on climate change management and reporting practices.

With more than 200 companies responding to the survey, here are some interesting insights on how companies are approaching climate change management within the region:

  • Most companies see energy and carbon related risks as one of the main sustainability drivers in the next 5 years
  • Less than 50% of companies measure and monitor their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions
  • Nearly 30% of companies set target to reduce GHG emissions
  • Only 26% of companies disclose GHG emission externally

Regionally companies are acknowledging the risks and opportunities of climate change. Although currently there is a lack of regulatory requirement, companies are moving beyond compliance, agreeing that in the near future, energy and carbon related cost will be the number one sustainability driver within the region.

This report also highlights a case study on how PwC assisted a global conglomerate measure their carbon footprint and identify reduction initiatives. In doing so the company discovered many other benefits to managing and reporting on climate change.

Download the report here

How we can help

Our Sustainability & Climate Change team can help you integrate sustainability into your organisation's long term strategic and operational plans to create lasting value, enhance reputation and build public trust. Our team offers you support in strategic sustainability, carbon management, supply chain operations, assurance and reporting, governance, risk and compliance, policy and economics and tax and the regulatory environment.

For more details on our service offering, feel free to contact Rashyid Anwarudin at +60 (3) 2173 0956.

Look out for more from us

We’ll be using "Ahead on Sustainability” as the platform to share developments and "nice to know" matters on the sustainability & climate change agenda. We hope you’ll find this useful and interesting and we look forward to your feedback or questions.


Note: This information has been prepared for general guidance on matters of interest only, and does not constitute professional advice. You should not act upon the information contained in this document without obtaining specific professional advice. No representation or warranty (express or implied) is given as to the accuracy or completeness of the information contained in this document, and, to the extent permitted by law, PwC Consulting Services (M) Sdn Bhd, its members, employees and agents do not accept or assume any liability, responsibility or duty of care for any consequences of you or anyone else acting, or refraining to act, in reliance on the information contained in this document or for any decision based on it.
© 2013 PwC Consulting Services (M) Sdn Bhd. All rights reserved. "PricewaterhouseCoopers" and/or "PwC" refers to the individual members of the PricewaterhouseCoopers organisation in Malaysia, each of which is a separate and independent legal entity. Please see www.pwc.com/structure for further details..

#4. Measuring and managing carbon

6 February 2013

We understand that in today’s market, businesses need to be prepared for unpredictability. Whether that’s policy, climate or consumer change. And that these businesses need tools to help analyse the impact of significant policy or market uncertainty on a decision. Extreme weather events look set to become more common, and business continuity will be a key challenge in future.

Yang Amat Berhormat Datuk Seri Najib Tun Razak, Prime Minister of Malaysia has committed to a 40% reduction in carbon intensity of GDP by 2020 based on 2005 emissions levels.

A practical first step towards carbon management is measuring carbon emissions followed by identifying operational improvement and carbon reduction opportunities.

Many businesses have found that once they start measuring their emissions they are able to identify ways to do things differently that not only reduce carbon emission but save them money.

Here are some of the benefits of managing carbon in businesses:

  • Enables identification of cost saving opportunities through improving energy efficiency of operations by reducing emissions and driving technological innovations
  • Enables reporting and dialogue around emissions and risks with stakeholders
  • Improves brand reputation and meets customer demands who in current times are increasingly more aware of issues related to climate change and carbon emissions
  • Drives competitive advantage in the market place and future-proofs business against new markets and regulations that may be adopted

For more insights

Here are a few additional materials to help you familiarise yourself with carbon measurement and management and how to incorporate it into your corporate strategy:


Note: This information has been prepared for general guidance on matters of interest only, and does not constitute professional advice. You should not act upon the information contained in this document without obtaining specific professional advice. No representation or warranty (express or implied) is given as to the accuracy or completeness of the information contained in this document, and, to the extent permitted by law, PricewaterhouseCoopers Advisory Services Sdn Bhd, its members, employees and agents do not accept or assume any liability, responsibility or duty of care for any consequences of you or anyone else acting, or refraining to act, in reliance on the information contained in this document or for any decision based on it.
© 2013 PricewaterhouseCoopers Advisory Services Sdn Bhd. All rights reserved. "PricewaterhouseCoopers" and/or "PwC" refers to the individual members of the PricewaterhouseCoopers organisation in Malaysia, each of which is a separate and independent legal entity. Please see www.pwc.com/structure for further details.

#3. Embedding sustainability into your corporate strategy

30 November 2012

Here at PwC, we understand the importance of incorporating sustainability into the business decision making process to manage new risks and grow business opportunities.

Developing and integrating sustainability into a company’s overall corporate strategy is becoming increasingly imperative to enhance a company’s long term performance. Companies that have inculcated sustainable solutions into their supply chains and business processes are ahead of their peers and are building public trusts.

Bursa Malaysia in its publication “Sustainable Guide for Directors” highlights that “companies are seeing increasing benefits from sustainability, i.e. cost reduction, better risk asset management, attracting and retaining talent. Sustainability has been identified as one of the three pillars in the New Economic Model and is the key to support the nation’s transition to a high income economy”

Going forward

On 29 March 2012, the Securities Commission (SC) released the Malaysian Code on Corporate Governance 2012 (MCCG 2012). It sets specific recommendations which companies should adopt in making good corporate governance an integral part of their business dealings and culture, effective 31 December 2012.

The MCCG sets out 8 broad principles followed by 26 corresponding recommendations which focus on:

  • Laying a strong foundation for the Board and its committees to carry out their roles effectively
  • Promoting timely and balance disclosure
  • Safeguarding the integrity of financial reporting
  • Emphasising the importance of risk management and internal controls
  • Encouraging shareholder participation in general meetings

Interestingly, the code’s first principle, “establishing clear roles and responsibilities” recommends that the Board ensures that the company’s strategy promotes sustainability. In view of this, companies should make an early transition to the principles and recommendations elaborated in this new code.

For more insights

An overview of MCCG 2012 and our point of view on the key issues highlighted in the code is available here.



Note: This information has been prepared for general guidance on matters of interest only, and does not constitute professional advice. You should not act upon the information contained in this document without obtaining specific professional advice. No representation or warranty (express or implied) is given as to the accuracy or completeness of the information contained in this document, and, to the extent permitted by law, PricewaterhouseCoopers Advisory Services Sdn Bhd, its members, employees and agents do not accept or assume any liability, responsibility or duty of care for any consequences of you or anyone else acting, or refraining to act, in reliance on the information contained in this document or for any decision based on it.
© 2013 PricewaterhouseCoopers Advisory Services Sdn Bhd. All rights reserved. "PricewaterhouseCoopers" and/or "PwC" refers to the individual members of the PricewaterhouseCoopers organisation in Malaysia, each of which is a separate and independent legal entity. Please see www.pwc.com/structure for further details.

#2. Stakeholder engagement – business success, reputation & innovation

29 October 2012

There are many reasons why businesses should establish and nurture relationships with their stakeholders today. The following is just a few of them:

Companies are no longer answerable only to their shareholders

We inhabit a pluralistic society consisting of people with a variety of interests, expectations and demands as to what businesses ought to provide to accommodate people’s lives and lifestyles. Only by responding to their expectations can businesses create the conditions needed for continuing business success.

Stakeholders are becoming more empowered

This is true now more than ever with the growth of social media. Online platforms of self-expression such as Facebook, Youtube and Twitter are freely accessible to millions and are able to make or break a firm’s reputation in an instant. Stakeholder engagement becomes a necessary tool in corporate communications and reputational risk mitigation.

Intangible assets are increasing in importance

The shift towards a more globalised and knowledge-based economy has also shifted the emphasis on tangible assets, such as property and equipment, to intangible assets, such as human and social capital, as sources of value creation.

Conversations with stakeholders may be a source of innovation

Meaningful and transparent conversations with stakeholders may yield insights and intelligence that help businesses serve their communities more efficiently and effectively. They are also opportunities for companies to solicit feedback and innovation on their products and/or services and foster co-creation. In this way, value is created and everybody wins.

Indeed, many leading global corporations have taken steps towards building a dialogue with their stakeholders. For example:

  • Air France-KLM includes stakeholder engagement tables in their sustainability report that detail their diverse stakeholder groups, the various initiatives taken to engage them, along with the outcomes of those engagements. For details, please refer to the 2011 Air France-KLM Sustainability Report (p. 68).
  • Big consumer brands such as Nike and Puma have turned to using social networking websites such as Facebook and Twitter to allow interaction with its stakeholders to build relationships and continuously seek feedback to be more sustainable.

Note: This information has been prepared for general guidance on matters of interest only, and does not constitute professional advice. You should not act upon the information contained in this document without obtaining specific professional advice. No representation or warranty (express or implied) is given as to the accuracy or completeness of the information contained in this document, and, to the extent permitted by law, PricewaterhouseCoopers Advisory Services Sdn Bhd, its members, employees and agents do not accept or assume any liability, responsibility or duty of care for any consequences of you or anyone else acting, or refraining to act, in reliance on the information contained in this document or for any decision based on it.
© 2013 PricewaterhouseCoopers Advisory Services Sdn Bhd. All rights reserved. "PricewaterhouseCoopers" and/or "PwC" refers to the individual members of the PricewaterhouseCoopers organisation in Malaysia, each of which is a separate and independent legal entity. Please see www.pwc.com/structure for further details.

#1. Sustainability as a Strategic Advantage

3 September 2012

Here at PwC, we are interested in how companies have used the sustainability agenda as a strategic advantage to move beyond short-term profitability towards long term sustainability. Ever wondered what it would cost for a company to be sustainable? Here are some interesting testimonies of how doing business in a sustainable way pay off:

In 2011, IBM estimated that its environmental savings and cost avoidance worldwide totalled US$139.1 million. Marc Bolland, CEO of Marks and Spencer was quoted saying “our environmental and ethical plan not only makes us a more efficient business, it contributed a net benefit of £105m.”

Nestlé Malaysia, winner of ACCA Malaysia Sustainability Reporting Awards 2011 (ACCA MaSRA), for best sustainability report, registered a turnover of RM4.7 billion in 2011, 16.8% higher than the same period last year.

These are just a few examples of companies which have successfully used the sustainability agenda to move beyond short-term profitability towards long term sustainability. In line with this, there is growing interest from investors on what companies are doing to be sustainable.

For more insights

Find out what is expected of companies from an investor’s perspective. Read the report“Translating environmental, social and governance factors into sustainable business value” , jointly published by the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD) and United Nations Environment Programme Finance Initiative (UNEP FI).


Note: This information has been prepared for general guidance on matters of interest only, and does not constitute professional advice. You should not act upon the information contained in this document without obtaining specific professional advice. No representation or warranty (express or implied) is given as to the accuracy or completeness of the information contained in this document, and, to the extent permitted by law, PricewaterhouseCoopers Advisory Services Sdn Bhd, its members, employees and agents do not accept or assume any liability, responsibility or duty of care for any consequences of you or anyone else acting, or refraining to act, in reliance on the information contained in this document or for any decision based on it.
© 2013 PricewaterhouseCoopers Advisory Services Sdn Bhd. All rights reserved. "PricewaterhouseCoopers" and/or "PwC" refers to the individual members of the PricewaterhouseCoopers organisation in Malaysia, each of which is a separate and independent legal entity. Please see www.pwc.com/structure for further details.


Special Edition


12 April 2013: The first index that recognises sustainability champions from emerging markets

Recently launched, the Dow Jones Sustainability Emerging Markets Index (DJSI Emerging Markets) tracks the financial and sustainability performance of the region’s largest companies. Learn more

29 September 2012: Update on GRI Sustainability Reporting Guideline

The Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) is currently updating its Sustainability Reporting Guideline. There are five areas with profound changes, namely disclosure on management approach, governance & remuneration, application levels, boundary, and supply chain. Learn more

12 September 2012: Launch of CDP Global 500 Climate Change Report: Business resilience in an uncertain, resource-constrained world

We're pleased to announce that the 2012 Carbon Disclosure Project (CDP) results have been published. The report was co-written with PwC, CDP's Global Advisor and report writer since 2008. Learn more



The Agenda on Sustainability is our platform for sharing developments on sustainability and the climate change agenda.

Want to subscribe? Register here

Our insights

#4. Measuring and managing carbon

6 February 2013

We understand that in today’s market, businesses need to be prepared for unpredictability. Whether that’s policy, climate or consumer change. And that these businesses need tools to help analyse the impact of significant policy or market uncertainty on a decision. Extreme weather events look set to become more common, and business continuity will be a key challenge in future.

Yang Amat Berhormat Datuk Seri Najib Tun Razak, Prime Minister of Malaysia has committed to a 40% reduction in carbon intensity of GDP by 2020 based on 2005 emissions levels.

A practical first step towards carbon management is measuring carbon emissions followed by identifying operational improvement and carbon reduction opportunities.

Many businesses have found that once they start measuring their emissions they are able to identify ways to do things differently that not only reduce carbon emission but save them money.

Here are some of the benefits of managing carbon in businesses:

  • Enables identification of cost saving opportunities through improving energy efficiency of operations by reducing emissions and driving technological innovations
  • Enables reporting and dialogue around emissions and risks with stakeholders
  • Improves brand reputation and meets customer demands who in current times are increasingly more aware of issues related to climate change and carbon emissions
  • Drives competitive advantage in the market place and future-proofs business against new markets and regulations that may be adopted

For more insights

Here are a few additional materials to help you familiarise yourself with carbon measurement and management and how to incorporate it into your corporate strategy:


Note: This information has been prepared for general guidance on matters of interest only, and does not constitute professional advice. You should not act upon the information contained in this document without obtaining specific professional advice. No representation or warranty (express or implied) is given as to the accuracy or completeness of the information contained in this document, and, to the extent permitted by law, PricewaterhouseCoopers Advisory Services Sdn Bhd, its members, employees and agents do not accept or assume any liability, responsibility or duty of care for any consequences of you or anyone else acting, or refraining to act, in reliance on the information contained in this document or for any decision based on it.
© 2013 PricewaterhouseCoopers Advisory Services Sdn Bhd. All rights reserved. "PricewaterhouseCoopers" and/or "PwC" refers to the individual members of the PricewaterhouseCoopers organisation in Malaysia, each of which is a separate and independent legal entity. Please see www.pwc.com/structure for further details.

#3. Embedding sustainability into your corporate strategy

30 November 2012

Here at PwC, we understand the importance of incorporating sustainability into the business decision making process to manage new risks and grow business opportunities.

Developing and integrating sustainability into a company’s overall corporate strategy is becoming increasingly imperative to enhance a company’s long term performance. Companies that have inculcated sustainable solutions into their supply chains and business processes are ahead of their peers and are building public trusts.

Bursa Malaysia in its publication “Sustainable Guide for Directors” highlights that “companies are seeing increasing benefits from sustainability, i.e. cost reduction, better risk asset management, attracting and retaining talent. Sustainability has been identified as one of the three pillars in the New Economic Model and is the key to support the nation’s transition to a high income economy”

Going forward

On 29 March 2012, the Securities Commission (SC) released the Malaysian Code on Corporate Governance 2012 (MCCG 2012). It sets specific recommendations which companies should adopt in making good corporate governance an integral part of their business dealings and culture, effective 31 December 2012.

The MCCG sets out 8 broad principles followed by 26 corresponding recommendations which focus on:

  • Laying a strong foundation for the Board and its committees to carry out their roles effectively
  • Promoting timely and balance disclosure
  • Safeguarding the integrity of financial reporting
  • Emphasising the importance of risk management and internal controls
  • Encouraging shareholder participation in general meetings

Interestingly, the code’s first principle, “establishing clear roles and responsibilities” recommends that the Board ensures that the company’s strategy promotes sustainability. In view of this, companies should make an early transition to the principles and recommendations elaborated in this new code.

For more insights

An overview of MCCG 2012 and our point of view on the key issues highlighted in the code is available here.



Note: This information has been prepared for general guidance on matters of interest only, and does not constitute professional advice. You should not act upon the information contained in this document without obtaining specific professional advice. No representation or warranty (express or implied) is given as to the accuracy or completeness of the information contained in this document, and, to the extent permitted by law, PricewaterhouseCoopers Advisory Services Sdn Bhd, its members, employees and agents do not accept or assume any liability, responsibility or duty of care for any consequences of you or anyone else acting, or refraining to act, in reliance on the information contained in this document or for any decision based on it.
© 2013 PricewaterhouseCoopers Advisory Services Sdn Bhd. All rights reserved. "PricewaterhouseCoopers" and/or "PwC" refers to the individual members of the PricewaterhouseCoopers organisation in Malaysia, each of which is a separate and independent legal entity. Please see www.pwc.com/structure for further details.

#2. Stakeholder engagement – business success, reputation & innovation

29 October 2012

There are many reasons why businesses should establish and nurture relationships with their stakeholders today. The following is just a few of them:

Companies are no longer answerable only to their shareholders

We inhabit a pluralistic society consisting of people with a variety of interests, expectations and demands as to what businesses ought to provide to accommodate people’s lives and lifestyles. Only by responding to their expectations can businesses create the conditions needed for continuing business success.

Stakeholders are becoming more empowered

This is true now more than ever with the growth of social media. Online platforms of self-expression such as Facebook, Youtube and Twitter are freely accessible to millions and are able to make or break a firm’s reputation in an instant. Stakeholder engagement becomes a necessary tool in corporate communications and reputational risk mitigation.

Intangible assets are increasing in importance

The shift towards a more globalised and knowledge-based economy has also shifted the emphasis on tangible assets, such as property and equipment, to intangible assets, such as human and social capital, as sources of value creation.

Conversations with stakeholders may be a source of innovation

Meaningful and transparent conversations with stakeholders may yield insights and intelligence that help businesses serve their communities more efficiently and effectively. They are also opportunities for companies to solicit feedback and innovation on their products and/or services and foster co-creation. In this way, value is created and everybody wins.

Indeed, many leading global corporations have taken steps towards building a dialogue with their stakeholders. For example:

  • Air France-KLM includes stakeholder engagement tables in their sustainability report that detail their diverse stakeholder groups, the various initiatives taken to engage them, along with the outcomes of those engagements. For details, please refer to the 2011 Air France-KLM Sustainability Report (p. 68).
  • Big consumer brands such as Nike and Puma have turned to using social networking websites such as Facebook and Twitter to allow interaction with its stakeholders to build relationships and continuously seek feedback to be more sustainable.

Note: This information has been prepared for general guidance on matters of interest only, and does not constitute professional advice. You should not act upon the information contained in this document without obtaining specific professional advice. No representation or warranty (express or implied) is given as to the accuracy or completeness of the information contained in this document, and, to the extent permitted by law, PricewaterhouseCoopers Advisory Services Sdn Bhd, its members, employees and agents do not accept or assume any liability, responsibility or duty of care for any consequences of you or anyone else acting, or refraining to act, in reliance on the information contained in this document or for any decision based on it.
© 2013 PricewaterhouseCoopers Advisory Services Sdn Bhd. All rights reserved. "PricewaterhouseCoopers" and/or "PwC" refers to the individual members of the PricewaterhouseCoopers organisation in Malaysia, each of which is a separate and independent legal entity. Please see www.pwc.com/structure for further details.

#1. Sustainability as a Strategic Advantage

3 September 2012

Here at PwC, we are interested in how companies have used the sustainability agenda as a strategic advantage to move beyond short-term profitability towards long term sustainability. Ever wondered what it would cost for a company to be sustainable? Here are some interesting testimonies of how doing business in a sustainable way pay off:

In 2011, IBM estimated that its environmental savings and cost avoidance worldwide totalled US$139.1 million. Marc Bolland, CEO of Marks and Spencer was quoted saying “our environmental and ethical plan not only makes us a more efficient business, it contributed a net benefit of £105m.”

Nestlé Malaysia, winner of ACCA Malaysia Sustainability Reporting Awards 2011 (ACCA MaSRA), for best sustainability report, registered a turnover of RM4.7 billion in 2011, 16.8% higher than the same period last year.

These are just a few examples of companies which have successfully used the sustainability agenda to move beyond short-term profitability towards long term sustainability. In line with this, there is growing interest from investors on what companies are doing to be sustainable.

For more insights

Find out what is expected of companies from an investor’s perspective. Read the report“Translating environmental, social and governance factors into sustainable business value” , jointly published by the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD) and United Nations Environment Programme Finance Initiative (UNEP FI).


Note: This information has been prepared for general guidance on matters of interest only, and does not constitute professional advice. You should not act upon the information contained in this document without obtaining specific professional advice. No representation or warranty (express or implied) is given as to the accuracy or completeness of the information contained in this document, and, to the extent permitted by law, PricewaterhouseCoopers Advisory Services Sdn Bhd, its members, employees and agents do not accept or assume any liability, responsibility or duty of care for any consequences of you or anyone else acting, or refraining to act, in reliance on the information contained in this document or for any decision based on it.
© 2013 PricewaterhouseCoopers Advisory Services Sdn Bhd. All rights reserved. "PricewaterhouseCoopers" and/or "PwC" refers to the individual members of the PricewaterhouseCoopers organisation in Malaysia, each of which is a separate and independent legal entity. Please see www.pwc.com/structure for further details.


Special Edition

Launch of Dow Jones Sustainability (DJSI) Emerging Markets Index

12 April 2013: The first index that recognises sustainability champions from emerging markets

Recently launched, the Dow Jones Sustainability Emerging Markets Index (DJSI Emerging Markets) tracks the financial and sustainability performance of the region’s largest companies. Learn more


Update on GRI Sustainability Reporting Guideline

29 September 2012: Update on GRI Sustainability Reporting Guideline

The Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) is currently updating its Sustainability Reporting Guideline. There are five areas with profound changes, namely disclosure on management approach, governance & remuneration, application levels, boundary, and supply chain. Learn more


Carbon Disclosure Project (CDP) 2012

12 September 2012: Launch of CDP Global 500 Climate Change Report: Business resilience in an uncertain, resource-constrained world

We're pleased to announce that the 2012 Carbon Disclosure Project (CDP) results have been published. The report was co-written with PwC, CDP's Global Advisor and report writer since 2008. Learn more