Publications

View this page in: Français

PwC 26th Annual Global Forest & Paper Industry Conference in review - Growing the future
The 26th annual PwC Global Forest & Paper Industry Conference was held in Vancouver, Canada on May 9, 2013. With the theme, Growing the future: Global strategies for sustainable success, the conference brought together 400 CEOs, senior executives, customers, suppliers, financial analysts, government representatives and other stakeholders.

Global Forest and Paper Industry: Net Earnings Summary — Three months ended December 31, 2013
Reports on the Net earnings from the Global Forest and Paper Industry.

Growing the future: forest, paper and packaging executives agree global collaboration is key to long-term sustainability
Leaders from the forest, paper and packaging industry agree that global collaboration is key to ensuring long-term sustainability. Learn what they had to say in our round table.

Sustainable growth: PwC Canada Forest, Paper and Packaging Practice Capability Statement 2013
PwC is an active participant in the forest and paper industry, contributing knowledge and experience gained from our long association with many of the industry’s leading companies.

Tax Insights: Supreme Court of Canada ruling in Daishowa-Marubeni — Tax treatment of reforestation obligations on sale of forestry assets
John Saunders of Wilson & Partners LLP was successful in arguing the Daishowa-Marubeni case in the Supreme Court of Canada.

27th Annual Global Forest & Paper Industry Conference
PwC’s 27th Annual Global Forest & Paper Industry Conference is part of the Global Forest Products Leadership Summit 2014, a series of conferences focused on global pulp, paper, wood products and fibre-based packaging industries.

Forest, paper and packaging deals: Branching out 2010 annual review -- Global deal activity in the forest, paper and packaging industry
Forest, paper and packaging deals 2010 reviews deal activity in the sector. It was a busy year for deals but, as we predicted in last year’s report, they were largely confined to small transactions.